suffering participates in Christ’s anguish

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https://www3.dbu.edu/mitchell/theodicy.htm

Theodicy of Protest: This position is one that complains to God, objecting that God could have and on the surface should have intervened in any number of horrific circumstances. The sheer weight of atrocity is often cited. Some versions of this try to escape the classic problem by denying that God is all-loving, or at least appears to be (cf. Roth and Blumenthal). But perhaps it would be better to understand this position as speaking from a wounded position. The believer says to God, “As best I can understand from my limited position you appear to have allowed horrible things to happen. Why? Should you do such a thing?” Then, rather than walk away in disgust or disbelief, the believer waits on God. This is an approach modeled for us in the Psalms. Believers protest from the ground of covenant—this is what God has promised us and who he is; therefore, should not God intervene? (i.e. Ps 44, 74, 88, 102, 142) This position at its best seeks to continue to affirm God’s mystery and goodness even amidst confusion and doubt. Likewise, this position holds it important to identify with the suffering of others, not to make light of their pain by seeking easily to explain it.

Disavowal of Theodicy: This position argues from a number of different directions that the theodicy project is misfounded. Some suggest that theodical language tends to deny, trivialize, or downplay the suffering of others. Or theodicy is seen as a mistaken approach to the problem because it results in closing down what only God can truly answer. For some theodicy, if done at all, must be done within the praxis of sufferers, while theoretical discussions are guilty of the above.


Dystheism (from Greek δυσ- dys-, “bad” and θεός theos, “god”), is the belief that a god, goddess, or singular God is not wholly good as is commonly believed (such as the monotheistic religions of Christianity and Judaism), and is possibly evil. (Wiki)

Image source: Dreamstime

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